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intro


NEPAL IS READY TO REBUILD.

SCROLL DOWN

intro


NEPAL IS READY TO REBUILD.

But how can we rebuild when the most accessible building

materials are not sustainable for the future?

 

DID YOU KNOW TRADITIONAL BRICKS ACCOUNT FOR

60% OF THE POLLUTION IN KATHMANDU?

 

The pollution from these bricks are just the beginning. Workers experience unstable conditions, children are taken advantage of and unfairly employed, and the amount of trees needed to fire bricks cause deforestation. Anyone from Takure who wants to build with these bricks needs to transport them 5 hours all the way from Kathmandu Valley, increasing their carbon footprint even more.

 

we are working with locals to provide a SUSTAINABLE alternative.

 


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cseb


Compressed Stabilized

Earth Blocks (CSEB)

cseb


Compressed Stabilized

Earth Blocks (CSEB)

Earth Blocks & The Training Center

We strive to support the Sindhupalchowk region in rebuilding sustainably with local materials. Our volunteer team works alongside local community members to produce Compressed Stabilized Earth Blocks (CSEB) at The Takure Training and Production Center. The earth blocks are composed of local soil, sand, and a small percentage of cement.

These CSEB have already been used to complete The Siddhartha Primary School, a senior center, a community center, orphanage, and homes in the surrounding community. The Training Center currently provides fair, full-time employment for over a dozen local Nepalis. These jobs allow locals to work within the community and stay with their families.. 

Ultimately we envision The Training Center as a self-sufficient, Nepali run business which can function as a national hub for local, culturally-relevant, sustainable, earthquake-resistant, and affordable technologies in building.


The Benefits

Load-bearing

Low energy input

Eco-friendly

Fire, insect and mold resistant

3X stronger than clay bricks

Earthquake-resistant

Create local jobs

Promote sustainability

Energy efficient

Utilize local materials

High thermal-capacity

Cost effective

 


Home Reconstruction

It has been two years since the ground shook and hundred of thousands of families in Nepal lost their homes. Now the dream of rebuilding is finally coming into fruition. The government recently began distributing foreign aid funds for reconstruction, which will be allocated overtime to insure earthquake resistant construction. The process of rebuilding is slow but one we are committed to. We are excited to share that this year five families chose to build with sustainable, locally-made CSEB instead of red clay bricks which contribute to 60% of the pollution in Kathmandu.


Community Projects

The Everest Children's Home

Completed July 2017

The Youth & Community Center

Completed May 2017

The Siddhartha Primary School

Completed July 2016

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rammed earth


Earthbag &

Rammed Earth

rammed earth


Earthbag &

Rammed Earth

Earthbag

Earthbag construction is an inexpensive method using mostly local soil to create structures which are strong and can be quickly built. Large polypropylene bags are filled will moist subsoil which contains enough clay to become cohesive when tamped. Walls are gradually built by laying the bags in courses which are then tamped and form a staggering pattern similar to that with bricklaying. To improve friction between bags and wall tensile strength, barbed wire is placed between courses. Rebar is then hammered into the walls to strengthen corners and provide earthquake-resistance. Once plastered, the earthbags remain safe from water and solar degradation.


Rammed Earth

Rammed earth is an ancient earth-building technique that compacts sand, gravel, and soil to make full rock-wall panels. This technique mimics how nature makes rock by compacting sediment in place. Using a wooden frame to hold it all in place, the earth mixture is manually compacted using steel rammers. This technique allows for the construction of a sustainable, affordable, long-lasting, well insulated, and earthquake resistant home.


Community Projects

 

Sunita's Earthbag Home

Completed June 2017

The Women's Co-op

Completed May 2017

 
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community project


COMMUNITY PROJECTS

community project


COMMUNITY PROJECTS

The Everest Children's Home

Compressed Stabilized Earth Blocks (CSEB)

Completed: July 2017

The 2015 earthquake in Nepal left hundreds of thousands of families without homes, and powerfully transformed the lives of millions of people across the country – none more effected than the children who overnight lost their families and their communities. On April 25th hundreds of children suddenly became orphans.. For the last 2 years, some of these children have been living in a temporary space on rented land about 1 hour walk from the Conscious Impact camp at The Everest Children's Home. Now it's time for a permanent home.

Once the second floor has been completed, the construction will use more than 10,000 of our Compressed Stabilized Earth Blocks (CSEBs), made locally with sustainable materials. With 8 rooms, a library, 3 toilets and a kitchen/dining hall, the orphanage will eventually be able to house as many as 30 children.  Our hope is that this project will be a home to children in need for years to come, and will also represent one of the most beautiful and earthquake-safe structures in the region.


Sunita Tamang's Home

Earthbag

Completed June 2017

In collaboration with Back to Earth, we built an earthbag home for local community member, Sunita Tamang. Sunita has been raising her three children on her own while working since she lost her husband just before the 2015 earthquakes. After nearly four months of construction, Sunita now has a new earthquake-resistant home which is the first of it's kind in her community. Each course of bags were laid and plastered by a team of Nepali masons and international volunteers. 


The Youth and Community Center

Compressed Stabilized Earth Blocks (CSEB)

Completed: May 2017

The Nawalpur Community & Youth Center was built with Compressed Stabilized Earth Blocks (CSEBs) by our team of Nepalis and international volunteers. This project took almost 4 months to complete and we hope it will provide a safe learning and sharing space for youth in the region for decades to come. 


The Women's Microfinance Co-op

Rammed Earth

Completed May 2017

In collaboration with Back to Earth, an organization specializing in earthen building, we built a rammed earth office and meeting hall for the local women's financial cooperative. The Women's Co-op currently functions as a micro-finance group with approximately 730 members from various households in the Nawalpur district. Each month, the women pay a membership fee of 100 rupees (1 USD) which qualifies them to apply for loans anywhere from 5,000 to 50,000 rupees. Most families in our area are practicing agriculturists whose work simply provides enough for basic necessities. These loans allow opportunities to invest in livestock, provide simple necessities for their households, or manage a medical emergency. Rammed earth is an ancient building method which is simple to construct with local materials, affordable, strong, and durable.


The Siddhartha Primary School

Compressed Stabilized Earth Blocks (CSEB)

Completed: July 2016

Our volunteer team worked alongside local skilled masons to rebuild the Siddhartha Primary School using CSEBs produced in Takure. Compressed Stabilized Earth Blocks (CSEBs) are load-bearing. However, the existing steel structure survived the earthquake, but the stone walls, which were built around the steel, were badly damaged. Our team demolished the remainders of the previous walls, built extensive retaining walls around the site, and prepared foundations for the new CSEB walls. We built three units which provided six classrooms, an office, and three latrines. The school, reinforced with rebar, now provides a safe learning space for approximately 60 students and was our first demonstration of alternative building techniques. 

Many thanks to architect Fred Dolmans, of GroundUp, a registered architectural consultancy that offers professional design expertise and sustainable solutions in locations around the world.